Shares Outstanding

Outstanding shares that are stated on company Balance Sheet are used when calculating many important valuation and performance indicators including Return on Equity, Market Cap, EPS and many others.
The Shares Outstanding Fundamental Analysis lookup allows you to check this and other indicators for any equity instrument. You can also select from a set of available indicators by clicking on the link to the right. Please note, this module does not cover all equities due to inconsistencies in global equity categorizations. Please continue to Equity Screeners to view more equity screening tools.

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Outstanding shares that are stated on company Balance Sheet are used when calculating many important valuation and performance indicators including Return on Equity, Market Cap, EPS and many others.

Shares Outstanding 
 = 
Public Shares 
Repurchased 

Outstanding Shares are shares of common stock of a public company that were purchased by investors after they were authorized and issued by the company to the public. Outstanding Shares are typically reported on fully diluted bases, including exotic instruments such as options, or convertibles bonds.

Shares Outstanding In A Nutshell

Shares outstanding are all shares that have not been repurchased by the company and taken out of circulation for the time being. Why might you need to know shares outstanding, the first is if a company is implementing a share buyback program.

There are a set number of shares that are made when a company decides to go public. With that comes different classes and other differing factors, but for this explanation, we are focusing on outstanding shares.

Closer Look at Shares Outstanding

When a company takes shares out of circulation, it drives price up in theory because there is less supply and demand has not changed, but that does not always take place in a free market. Shares outstanding also may increase if the company sells more shares to the market giving them more cash to spend as they wish.

If you see shares outstanding increasing, you may want to take a step back and see if there is a reason why it is increasing. It could be all apart of their plan which is fine, but if the company is struggling for cash and keeps selling shares to the market, that could be an indication of greater issues.

The ideal situation would be the company slowly purchases their shares back, increasing the value of the stock and the company becomes dependent upon their own cash flow. Of course each company has their own plan for outstanding shares and you need to fully understand what the company has in mind. Ideally you want to see the company sticking to their game plan and going with the flow. This should not be a huge issue, but it certainly can if the balance of shares begins to swing wildly.

Take a look on the Internet and see how others use shares outstanding in their research of a company. This could also lead into liquidity because smaller companies are not as traded and they may not have as many shares outstanding. All of these can be affected so be sure to take a quick glance and see what is going on. If you get stuck, reach out to an investing community or investing professional as they can help to point you in the right direction. Share count is an interesting factor to take a look at and it may swing your research into a direction you otherwise would have skipped.

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